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20121001
20121031
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KQED (PBS) 36
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English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 12, 2012 7:30pm PDT
continues over san francisco sheriff ross mirkarimi's future even after he's reinstated by the board of supervisors. >>> plus writer lynn povich and her husband, steve shepard on journalism's transition to the digital age, coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm belva davis and welcome to this week in northern california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democrats wanted to see. if joe biden had one job at this event, it was to pump up the base. he did that job this week after obama's disappointing debate. and we saw obama here this week. this was a very busy week in politics
PBS
Oct 17, 2012 3:00pm PDT
gearing up for the america's cup in san francisco next year. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> when i was in an accident, i was worried, the health system spoke a language all its own, with united health care, i got health care for my life, information on my phone, and connection to doctors who get where i'm frii√ćo, and tools to estimate what are my costs, so i might never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> beijing, for 15 years, viking has brought 40 million travellers to another world, the world of dramatic landscapes. and remarkable areas. all brought to life with the modern concept, so travellers can spend less time getting there and more time there. viking cruises, exploring the world in comfort. >> and b and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these instit
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 7:30pm PDT
for the bay asia news group. and joe garofoli, political reporter for "the san francisco chronicle." joe, you were in denver for the first presidential debate. must have been hard covering it, since there were so many people tweeting that night. tell us what's happened since then. how are the candidates -- >> things have really evolved over the last 40 ho8 hours. it was widely perceived that the president did not have a good night. didn't really realize the date is also a show, not just a competition of ideas. but in the intervening 48 hours, been a lot of fact checking, some of the stuff that romney said, that's catching up to him and the job numbers have come out today. and those have been helpful to the president, a little pit, the unemployment rate dropped to 7.8%, the lowest since he's been president, and that helps. because the republicans have been saying the last three years, unemployment rate has been high and not dropping below 8%. so, this is sort of a symbolic victory. not going to move voters, but a symbolic victory for the president. >> belva: how was it covering it in this new
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:00pm PDT
for their personal safety, we could change the outcome. >> the city of san francisco was struck by an earthquake of frightening proportions. >> one of the most catastrophic earthquakes was in 1906 when thousands of people died in san francisco. today is the anniversary of the 1989 quake which brought down freeways. earthquakes are part of life here, but the scientists keyboarding the big one -- keep warning that the big one is long overdue. >> it is all about raising awareness. that was a simulation. it was very intense. it could be up to two minutes and that would cause a lot of damage. that is what people are taught to do. but a lot and a ball and protect yourself and wait for it to finish the to bundle up in a ball and protect yourself and wait for it to finish. it reminds people of the big one will come along one day and they should be ready. >> the importance of being trained to take cover. that brings today's program to close. you confine constant updates on our website. you can reach most of the team, go to twitter. thank you for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/ne
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 3:00pm PDT
were killed in violence on sunday. the city of san francisco celebrated the giants' latest world series championship today. fans poured into the streets last night after their team swept the detroit tigers. the giants won 4-3 in ten innings to take their second title in three years. no national league team had swept a world series since the 1990 cincinnati reds. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: it's become a ritual of modern presidential elections to look for an "october surprise," a late- breaking development that requires both sides to recalibrate. this year, it's come in the form of a massive storm. . >> crowley: scrambled campaign plans whether they were in the area affected by the hurricane or not. republican challenger mitt romney went ahead and held a rally in avon lake, ohio, this morning but said everyone's thoughts should be with those in the storm's path. >> u.s. with full hearts and clear eyes can see what's happening across the country right now. and on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficul
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 2:30pm PDT
called out morantha waters. she was living in san francisco with her husband in a nice apartment. her second husband said to her, you have $10,000 from your first husband. let's invest in san miguel island. it is one of the islands off the coast of santa barbara, where i live, the farthest south and the windiest. the problem with her, she had consumption. it is 1888. the only cure they knew was a rest cure with fresh air. in san for cisco, we all know it is foggy, cold, and miserable. her husband said, if we go to san miguel, it will be warmer, good air, it will help you. guess what? it is even worse than san francisco. the wind blows, it is eroded, they have sandstorms, so she did not do so well. she lasted six months and a few years later, she died. meanwhile, the husband, like some fairy tale, took the young girl, edith, out of school and brought her back out there to live with three men and be there to take care of her. whether she escapes or not, i am not going to tell everybody. you are going to have to read the book. the second part, i was amazed at the correspondences between
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 7:30pm PDT
around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday plan. part of that is lopping days off of the school year. and it can be up to ten days next year. that's two weeks off of the school year. >> richard caranza says his district, though well supported by voter-passed bond measures and parcel taxes, has suffered as the state's economy tanked and, along with it, state support. >> we are a bare bones organization. and we're just able to keep the lights on, the doors open and the teachers in classroom. >> californians are about to vote on two competing initiatives, 30 and 38. they are both temporary tax increases aimed at funding public schools. caranza supports prop 30 and fears if it fails -- >> there is no worse scenario. it's -- it's def-con 5. >> from cities to suburbs, the decline in state funding and the slump in property values has hit hard. since 2007, the purse student spending in california has been cut by more than $1,200, while costs and salaries continue to rise.
PBS
Oct 13, 2012 12:00am PDT
the next mark zuckerberg. i'm in coffeeshops in san francisco meeting with entrepreneurs, i probably go to 10 to 15 different start-ups during a week. i want to find big disruptive ideas. >> rose: but with ideas before they've done anything to move forward on the ideas. >> absolutely. sometimes it is an entrepreneur that has an idea that hasn't even started coding it yet but they have done something previously that was interesting. so i know they have the means to go about building something. and they just want to, you know, brainstorm with me and white board some of these ideas out. >> farther of-- part of what we are looking for is we're investing in teams and people, more than products at the early stages. so you are looking for larry and sergei as they were starting out. because they're what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. so we're looking for people that fit that mold. >> rose: and how do you find them? and what are they like? >> two questions so, how do we find them. this is a social business. so it has to do with networks and working with people and
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 7:30pm PDT
give money to a candidate, you might be corrupting them. we need to cap that. in san francisco, give a $500 contribution. it's regulated, it must be disclosed because that's where we said corruption can come into the system. if you want to spend money on your own and not give it to a candidate, the supreme court, essentially beginning in 1994, said that's not corrupting the system. so you can spend as much as you can as long as it's not coordinated with a candidate. the result of that is we have these amazing ads that are run but not run by the campaigns themselves but run with these groups with sort of odd names. >> but aren't these supposedly independent non-coordinated groups often have the same staff members who just worked in the campaign, sometimes working out of offices very proximate to the campaign? >> and sometimes using campaign footage that was just used by the campaign. so the line between whether it's coordinated or not is obviously a very gray one, but when the campaign is negative, the candidate can say, not only do i want to you take it off the air, it would be illeg
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 2:30pm PDT
storytelling project. i workshop via biya baran institute in san francisco, a workshop that takes documentary's and three envisions them as a trans- medium digital projects. the notion was, at this moment in time, the health care debate was getting so noisy. the people on the front lines, their voices were not really being represented in that conversation. i was getting e-mails from whoever sang, share your story, tell your health care story, of lodi video. -- upload a video. i suspected that people were not doing that. we wanted to sit down and talk with people and meet with people. our question was, what are you waiting for? that led to profound and poignant moments of expression. the question was not, what do you think about health care reform, what do you think about this hospital, people just wanted to share who they were. they won the dignity in that moment. when you walk into a public hospital waiting room, if you lose your dignity. we wanted to capture that. that really set the tone for the film, this notion that, let's allow this community a voice and tried to step back ourselves and
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 12:00am PDT
your own hometown newspaper after san francisco, on debt, that is one and the other is, ceo's call for deficit action and so the question is, what is going to happen? let's assume president obama is reelected to the fiscal cliff. give us what you think is possible. >> okay. as you know, just to put it in context, we are at a place where in -- in order to raise the debt ceiling the republican agreed to -- well, everybody agreed to but the republicans all voted for, including the leadership a plan where we would have a super committee which would reduce the deficit by x amount of dollars and if not, we would go to a place where there would be a firewall between five and a half billion -- $500 billion, defense, domestic, just to put it in -- >> rose: right. >> not the best way to go about it, we should have been able to do it in the super committee but in order to do that, you have to have revenue. now, all of these people, the ceos -- >> rose: all say you need revenue -- >> all missing in action. no they are wonderful on that score but all missing in action when this step was being
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 7:00pm PDT
and medicaid doctors have been able to get as much as $64,000 to switch to electronic medical records. one san francisco company has seen its business grow thanks to the change in how doctors keep track of their patients. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: uptown, downtown and everywhere in between, nurse practitioner denis tarrant is always on the go. he's the founder of manhattan house calls. seeing patients in their homes is his business. >> let's see how your blood pressure is doing today. >> reporter: tarrant uses technology from practice fusion. the transition from paper files to electronic records hasn't just lightened his briefcase. >> it has helped me to organize my data more succinctly. it allows to give me more patient time instead of flipping through paper time and at the end of the day the patient really benefits from having the e.m.r. >> reporter: across the country adoption of electronic medical records by doctors and hospitals has surged over the past three years. the 2009 economic recovery act pays up to $64,000, for doctors who adopt and use new technology to maintain patien
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 12:00am PDT
scanners which you feed the paper ballot into the scan they are is how we do it in san francisco, the scanner tabulates, it looks at the paper ballot and tan hates the results and tremendous end zero at the end it gives you the counts, afterwards you can check on the computer and the scanner because you have the original paper ballots that the voter filled out so the voter knows they accurately reflect the voters' will. >> rose: what is the worst thing that has happened with voter machines? >> that is difficult, we may not know, we may not know. >> rose: okay. but is there any 11 in lawyer being the most famous case of voting machines irregularities? >> well, i would actually push back a little on that, because the machines in florida. >> rose: the problem -- >> of course it was a problem in 2000 bus that was paper, hanging chads, that's right, it was, but the vote in florida was all paper. well at that point they had machines tabulating the paper but the computers came in florida in 2002 where they had problems again because the machines took a lot of time to start up and peopl
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 3:00pm PDT
and useful to someone like david rumsey, a san francisco map collector with a healthy respect for apples efforts in digital map making. he runs apple maps on one ipad and google maps on his other. >> what's interesting about the apple is we are in 3-d. so as we zoom in we can change and see the whole scene in three dimensions. in google maps we can zoom in or course, the resolution is just as good. but we don't see it in 3-d. in order to see it in 3-d, we go to google earth. so googles got two applications, apple rolled it all into one. it's amazing they put this together so quickly. in some ways you see as a collector, i'd say i want them both. >> reporter: rumsey acknowledges that making maps always has been difficult, costly and labor- intensive. google is usually regarded as the leader of the digital world in maps, with everything from skyview to street view to google earth contributing to its displays. brian mcclendon is vice president of google maps. >> we worked very hard, we bought data from as many providers who had already been making maps before and tried to bring them togethe
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 3:00pm PDT
angeles and san francisco. his campaign and the democratic national committee raised $181 million in september, the most for any month this year. but money aside, it appears romney's performance in last week's highly watched debate has improved his standing in the race. a new gallup tracking poll found the candidates in a dead heat, each receiving 47% among registered voters. the president had held a five-point advantage before the debate. and the pew research center showed romney coming from eight points down to four points ahead among likely voters. there were also signs that he's regained ground in several battle ground states. all of which raises the stakes for this thursday'sen counter between vice president joe biden and vice president shall candidate paul ryan. a debate that will cover both domestic and foreign policy. for more on all this for more on all of this and the differences between the presidential candidates when it comes to foreign policy, we get two views. michele flournoy is the co-chair of the obama campaign's national security advisory committee. she also ser
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 3:00pm PDT
performance last week. he admitted as much at a fund-raiser last night in san francisco. >> after the debate, i had a bunch of folks come to me. don't be so polite. don't be so nice. ( cheers and applause ) but i want everybody to understand something. what was being presented wasn't leadership. that's salesmanship. governor romney's plan is to let wall street run wild again but he's going to bring the hammer down on sesame street. >> ifill: the obama campaign thought to exploit the sesame street reference today with a new television ad >> mitt romney knows it's not wall street you have to worry about. it's sesame street. >> i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs >> mitt romney taking on our enemies no matter where they nest >> ifill: sesame street workshop asked the obama campaign to pull the ad down. as paul ryan and joe biden prepare to meet in their debate later this week, the presidential candidates will continue to narrow their focus with a romney swing through ohio and a presidential visit to florida. >> woodruff: tonight's edition of front line on pbs searches past the campaign trail f
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 9:00pm PDT
) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (crowd cheers) >> narrator: and when goldwater received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was always willing to live according to his principles. he didn't shy away from any challenge. he was a very strong person in doing that. and we learned that you have to live up to what you believe in. >> narrator: one thing george romney believed in was the vietnam war. and one year later,
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)